a-ha’s from A New Earth chapter 5 tele-chat

Everyone has a phrase.

One that captures all our mental and emotional baggage that’s accumulated over the years, maybe even passed on from generation to generation.  This accumulation of old emotional pain,  or “the pain-body” as Eckhart calls it, is always there, lying dormant, waiting to be provoked.

How do you know what your phrase is? 

It’s the button we don’t want pushed.
It’s the one those closest to us know exactly how to push.
It’s the one that causes a reaction that’s very “unlike” us…
We become withdrawn, defensive, angry, sad, hopeless…

Do any of these resonate with you?

People can’t be trusted…
I don’t deserve abundance…
I don’t deserve love…
Life is supposed to be hard…
Life always lets you down…

It’s not as important to know what your phrase is, as it is to recognize when it’s awakened. 

Like anything ego-driven, it searches for ways to feed.  Pain-bodies are clever and conniving,  operating like a wild animal with survival on its mind. They feed on past stories, deeply embedded beliefs, that go way back… which is why they thrive in family settings… where there’s one big room full of pain-bodies to feed upon, slyly, without our even being aware of it.

If we don’t recognize it, what happens? 

The longer these pain-bodies live, the more miserable our life remains, keeping us totally unaware, disconnected, separate from the peace within us – our truest, best self.

Practicing presence is the only way to keep the pain-body dormant.

If this doesn’t encourage you to give presence a try, here’s another a-ha that might:

While our body is incredibly intelligent, it can not tell the difference between an actual situation and a thought.

If you’re walking around making mental movies about what she said, what he did, what you would say next time and how wrong they are… which describes the normal state of mind for most of us …energetically, your body is in a constant state of panic.

Most of us live in fight or flight mode…

where all of our systems are compromised affecting immunity, circulation, digestion, hormones, our ability to manage stress…

So, how do we tame the wild animal within? 

I thought this chapter called for some extra enlightened guidance.  So, I scrolled through my saved episodes of Oprah’s Super Soul Sunday and got some major a-ha’s from the master of mindfulness, Thich Naht Han, Zen Buddhist monk (the one Martin Luther King nominated for a Nobel Peace Prize.)

Check out his recommendations in “practicing presence. with Thich Naht Han.”

 

photo via Northern Sun (it’s a t-shirt!)